Filtering by: Q+A
The Brothers Karamazov
Nov
10
3:15 pm15:15

The Brothers Karamazov

The Brothers Karamazov novel is the epitome of Fyodor Dostoevsky’s creative work, the acme of the philosophic investigation carried out by this colossal and restless mind throughout his life. World renowned choreographer Boris Eifman offers a remarkable vision of the core ideas within the novel, expanding upon them though body language as a way of exploring the origins of the moral devastation of the Karamazovs; creating through choreographic art an equivalent of what Dostoyevsky investigated so masterfully in his book, the excruciating burden of destructive passions and evil heredity. 

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'The Eighth Life' with Nino Haratischvili
Nov
27
7:00 pm19:00

'The Eighth Life' with Nino Haratischvili

In collaboration with the British Georgian Society, Pushkin House presents a discussion and reading from Nino Haratischvili’s internationally bestselling novel The Eighth Life (for Brilka). Nino Haratischvili will be in conversation with Tom de Waal of the British Georgian Society on the subject of her book and the wider historical narratives it explores, accompanied by readings from the book's English translators, Charlotte Collins and Ruth Martin.

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Eugene Onegin (Encore)
Dec
15
2:30 pm14:30

Eugene Onegin (Encore)

The play unfolds in the memory and imagination of Pushkin’s characters. The images are split between past and present, between reality and imagination.The scale of the production constantly shifts from noisy celebrations to secluded contemplation, from crowd scenes to lonely recollections, all of which are drawn together from the past just like the fragments of Tatyana’s love letter, framed and hung on the wall, looming next to and above Onegin’s arm-chair.

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Children of the Sun
Jan
11
2:00 pm14:00

Children of the Sun

Written during the abortive Russian Revolution of 1905, Maxim Gorky's brilliant darkly comic "Children of the Sun" depicts the new middle-class, foolish perhaps but likeable, as they flounder, philosophize, and yearn for meaning, all while being totally blind to their impending annihilation. Multi-award-winning director Timofey Kulyabin's (Three Sisters, Onegin) modernized production, set in 1999 at Stanford University, focuses on the interplay between the characters, the relationships formed and broken, sparring over culture and the cosmos, barely sensing that their own privileged world is in jeopardy. Directed for the screen by Kulyabin and filmed from his Red Torch Theatre in Novosibirsk, Russia.

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Nithurst Farm: An Exploration of A New House by Architect Adam Richards, Inspired by 'Stalker'
Oct
9
7:00 pm19:00

Nithurst Farm: An Exploration of A New House by Architect Adam Richards, Inspired by 'Stalker'

Nestled in the South Downs National Park is an extraordinary new creation by architect Adam Richards, built for his family and drawing on sources as varied as Vanbrugh, Roman ruins and Stalker by Andrei Tarkovsky. There will be a presentation on the house, with images, followed by a Q&A with Pushkin House Director, Clem Cecil House.

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Soviet Metro Stations
Oct
1
6:00 pm18:00

Soviet Metro Stations

A lecture and presentation with photographer Christopher Herwig followed by a Q&A discussing his latest project - Soviet Metro Stations, a new book from Fuel Publishing. The book goes far beyond the obvious chandelier beauty of the Moscow Metro and explores the systems of 15 cities across 6 countries from the former USSR.

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Oscar Rabin: A Happy Life Journey
Sep
15
2:00 pm14:00

Oscar Rabin: A Happy Life Journey

A screening and discussion commemorating 45 years since the famous 1974 Bulldozer Exhibition that changed the course of art history in the Soviet Union. The afternoon will include a screening of Oscar Rabin: A Happy Life Journey (Оскар Рабин: Счастливый Путь) directed by Alexander Shatalov and produced by Marc Ivasilevitch. Rabin was the main organiser of the Bulldozer Exhibition and one of the Soviet Union’s leading non-official painters. The film will be followed by a panel discussion with Professor of Art History at Courtauld Institute, Sarah Wilson, arts patron, Marc Ivasilevitch, and art collector Sergei Revyakin.

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